Browse Vitae

Title Communities Regionsort descending
Elizabeth Bradfield
Isabel de Geinville

Amesbury, Double Monastery

Winnesia de Hoyton

Blackborough

Joan Bozum

Barrow Gurney

Etheldreda Wulmer

Crabhouse

Lucy

Goring

Colomba
Elizabeth Clopton

Redlingfield

Thecla

Athanasius, in his treatise On virginity, presented Thecla as a model virgin to the ascetic women living at home or in small, all-female communities in fourth-century Alexandria, Egypt.

During the fourth century, Athanasius in his Apologia de fuga sua describes a community of women who were forced to leave Alexandria, Egypt and relocate in the Kharga Oasis. On the necropolis of El Bagawat in the Kharga Oasis, two chapels include wall paintings which depict Thecla, one dating to the fourth century the other to later centuries (see "Artifacts"). Perhaps these refugee women founded a community with particular devotion to Thecla at El Bagawat.

An abundance of material evidence (papyri on which the Acts of Thecla are written, objects which depict Thecla, and churches dedicated to Thecla) indicate that Thecla had a strong following in Al-Fayyūm and in the Nile Valley. These cities include Antinoopolis (modern Sheikh-'Ibada), Oxyrhynchus (modern Al-Bashnasā), Arsinoe (modern Kīmān Fāris), and Aphroditopolis (modern Atfîḥ).

By the fifth century, a monastic community had sprung up at Hagia Thekla.

A number of clay flasks from Egypt depict St. Menas on one side, and Thecla on the other. This, coupled with a reference "the martyr shrine of Saint Thecla" in Miracles of St. Menas, 22.2.27-31, suggest that a shrine to Thecla was located near the pilgrimage center dedicated to St. Menas in Egypt in the fifth or sixth century. It is unclear whether a monastery was present at this shrine to Thecla, but it is likely that ascetic women made pilgrimages to this shrine.

There is also a Greek Orthodox convent dedicated to Mar Taqla in Maʻlūlā, a village fifty kilometers northeast of Damascus. The saint is believed to be buried there in a cave above the monastery. There is no evidence that any parts of the monastery or chapel date to the Byzantine period.

Avice/Amice/Amicia
Matilda

Littlemore

Margaret

Little Marlow

Muriel
Katherine de Lisle

Lyminster

Isabel

Brewood Black Ladies

Elizabeth Hothe

Thetford

Isabel Braynton

Godstow

Margaret de Cheyney

Carrow

Anne Rothenhall

Bungay

Catherine [of Siena]
Agnes de Kynewarton

Wroxall

Edith Lancelene

Godstow

Margaret Curzon
Alice

Easebourne

Joan de Gurnay

Barrow Gurney

Eleanor Weyland

Marham

Mabel la Wafre

Godstow

Hawise [of LEI] Cts.of Gloucester

Nuneaton

Mary
Roysia

Grace Dieu

Margery de Crek,nee de Hanes
Juliana

S. Sepulchre's, Canterbury

Isolda Walshe
Joan Brett
Isabel of Barrowby

Arthington

Isabel Wigan

Carrow

Cecilia de Draycote

Ilchester

Christine Holby
Maud

Littlemore

Isabella Bermyngham

Cluain Iraird

Isabel Weltham
Aelfgyva

Barking

Helena
Alice

S. Mary's Chester

Juliana

Arden

Petronel

Carrow

Loretta, Cts.of Leicester

Buckland

Agnes Lyon

Hospital of S. Paul

Margery de Berchesdone

Horton

Gormlaith

Cluain Iraird

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