Browse Vitae

Title Communities Regionsort descending
Joan de Pickford
Margery Pasmyche
Matilda

Barking

Julian [of Norwich]

Carrow

Matilda

Notre Dame des Vertus à la Flèche

Eve

Wilton

Emma de Waneting

Littlemore

Elizabeth

Cluain Iraird

Joan Marshall
Alice

Barking

Helewysia de Langley/Langelegh
Alice de la Haye/Matilda de la Haye

S. Mary's Chester

Isabel Couvel

Arden

Katherine de Wendling

Abstracts of the Inquisitiones Post Mortem Relating to Nottinghamshire, 1350-1436

Joan de Bere

NULL

Margaret Purdans

Thetford
Bruisyard

Elizabth Freemantle

Horton

Sibilla

Cluain Iraird

Katharine Ancel
Abyat
Anna
Elizabeth Bradfield
Isabel de Geinville

Amesbury, Double Monastery

Winnesia de Hoyton

Blackborough

Joan Bozum

Barrow Gurney

Etheldreda Wulmer

Crabhouse

Lucy

Goring

Colomba
Elizabeth Clopton

Redlingfield

Thecla

Athanasius, in his treatise On virginity, presented Thecla as a model virgin to the ascetic women living at home or in small, all-female communities in fourth-century Alexandria, Egypt.

During the fourth century, Athanasius in his Apologia de fuga sua describes a community of women who were forced to leave Alexandria, Egypt and relocate in the Kharga Oasis. On the necropolis of El Bagawat in the Kharga Oasis, two chapels include wall paintings which depict Thecla, one dating to the fourth century the other to later centuries (see "Artifacts"). Perhaps these refugee women founded a community with particular devotion to Thecla at El Bagawat.

An abundance of material evidence (papyri on which the Acts of Thecla are written, objects which depict Thecla, and churches dedicated to Thecla) indicate that Thecla had a strong following in Al-Fayyūm and in the Nile Valley. These cities include Antinoopolis (modern Sheikh-'Ibada), Oxyrhynchus (modern Al-Bashnasā), Arsinoe (modern Kīmān Fāris), and Aphroditopolis (modern Atfîḥ).

By the fifth century, a monastic community had sprung up at Hagia Thekla.

A number of clay flasks from Egypt depict St. Menas on one side, and Thecla on the other. This, coupled with a reference "the martyr shrine of Saint Thecla" in Miracles of St. Menas, 22.2.27-31, suggest that a shrine to Thecla was located near the pilgrimage center dedicated to St. Menas in Egypt in the fifth or sixth century. It is unclear whether a monastery was present at this shrine to Thecla, but it is likely that ascetic women made pilgrimages to this shrine.

There is also a Greek Orthodox convent dedicated to Mar Taqla in Maʻlūlā, a village fifty kilometers northeast of Damascus. The saint is believed to be buried there in a cave above the monastery. There is no evidence that any parts of the monastery or chapel date to the Byzantine period.

Avice/Amice/Amicia
Matilda

Littlemore

Neomi
Lewinna

Selsey

Alice

Blithbury

Maud

Thetford

Margaret Teukisbury

Godstow

Eleanor, Queen of England

Marham

Margaret Dalenger
Chiara Offreduccio di Favarone

Benedictine monastery San Paolo delle Abbadesse in Bastia, Beguine monastery San Angelo di Panzo, and Franciscan monastery S. Damiano.

Agnes de Somerville

Polesworth

Alice

Godstow

Margaret Ruskyn
Alice de Bissopeston

Rusper

Basilia of Sutton

Barrow Gurney

Margery

Marham

Alice de Gorges

Godstow

Erneburga

Polesworth

Sara de Strafford
Mariota Wassra

Grace Dieu

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