Sinningthwaite
Community ID
 
862
 
Town
 
York
 
Diocese
 
York
 
Region
 
Yorkshire
 
Medieval Location
 
West Riding inside Bilton-in- Ainsty
 
Modern Location
 
Sinningthwaite; 1 1/2 miles south-west of Bilton, route 1224
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary
 
Date Founded
 
1155 (circa)
 
Date Terminated
 
1536
 
Religious Order
 
Cistercian
 
Rule
 
Benedictine
 
Foundation Information
 

Bertram Haget, with his son and daughters, founded the community with the consent of Lord Roger of Mowbray.

 
Population Counts
 

According to Knowles and Hadcock, there were 12 nuns around the time of suppression besides the prioress. There were 10 in 1535 besides an ex-prioress and 2 chaplains (Medieval Religious Houses in England and Wales, 225).

 
Priveleges & Papal Exemptions
 

1172

 
Dependent Communities
 

Esholt was possibly founded by Sinningthwaite.

 
Visitations
 

The nunnery was visited and disciplined by archbishops, subsequent to their appeal to the pope in 1276 (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 108).

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Gundreda Haget, daughter of Bertram; Simon and Maud Ward gave land at Esholt.

 
Secular Political Affiliations
 

The community may have been linked with the community of Esholt in Yorkshire (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 221).

 
Income
 

The community had the income of the church of Bilton. In 1535 its net annual income was valued at 60 pounds, 15 shillings, and 2 pence.

 
Litigations
 

In 1276 the community appealed to the pope against the right of the archbishop to visit them, claiming the exemption of the Cistercian order and referring to the authority of the abbot of Fountains. They seem to have lost the appeal (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 107).

 
Early Documents
 

[1]Foundation confirmed by Roger of Mowbray (About 1160)
[2]Papal privilege conferred by Alexander II (1172)

 
Art & Artifacts
 

There was a serpent carved above the doorway of the nuns' refectory from the twelfth century. Gender and Material Culture: The Archaeology of Religious Women; 157.

 
Architecture & Archaeology
 

The remains of the priory consist of a two story house which was the south range of the cloister. The dwelling stands 40 feet high, 26 feet wide, and 52 feet long. The inside of the building contains 6 rooms divided equally between the upper and lower stories. A twelfth century portal of English Norman style exists on the north side with one order of leaf capitals over plain free- standing columns. Over the arch are zigzags which are at right angles to the wall surface and can be seen on both the upper and lower stories. Oppostie the house are some fragments cemented into the wall which date from the Norman times to the fourteenth century (The Buildings of England: Yorkshire West, 506, quoted in Medieval English Cistercian Nunneries: Their Art and Physical Remains), 175).

 
State Of Medieval Structure
 

The remains of the priory consist of a two story house which was the south range of the cloister. The dwelling stands 40 feet high, 26 feet wide, and 52 feet long. The inside of the building contains 6 rooms divided equally between the upper and lower stories. A twelfth century portal of English Norman style exists on the north side with one order of leaf capitals over plain free standing columns. Over the arch are zigzags which are at right angles to the wall surface and can be seen on both the upper and lower stories. Oppostie the house are some fragments cemented into the wall which date from the Norman time to the fourteenth century (The Buildings of England:Yorkshire West, 506, quoted inMedieval English Cistercian Nunneries: Their Art and Physical Remains), 175).

 
Admin. Notes
 

[V0802]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Date Started
 
1155
 
Date Finished
 
1536
 
Length
 
2568