Nunappleton
Community ID
 
860
 
Town
 
York
 
Diocese
 
York
 
Region
 
Yorkshire
 
Medieval Location
 
West Riding; with a gift to the nuns of Appleton of land near the Wharf river, which Julian held
 
Modern Location
 
2 miles north-west of Cawood, route 1222
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary and John the Evangelist
 
Date Founded
 
1148-54
 
Date Terminated
 
1539
 
Religious Order
 
Cistercian
 
Rule
 
Benedictine
 
Foundation Information
 

The community was founded by Eustace de Merche and his wife Alice of St Quintin (daughter of Agnes de Arches) and her child. It originally possessed brothers and nuns; anchoresses there prior to regular foundation.

 
Population Counts
 

There were 19 in 1539. There were probably over 30 nuns in the 13th century. After the suppression, the sub-prioress and 18 nuns were granted pensions.

 
Dependent Communities
 

Founder gave the church of S. Mary of Coddenham in Suffolk for a dependency, but gift was never actualized; the church passed to Royston Priory, a male monastery. Further research is needed to verify this.

 
Assets/Property
 

The community owned the site and land inside Thorp Arch. In York more than 23 pounds in pension from church of Ryther.

 
Income
 

In 1291 the gross income was over 40 pounds. In 1535 the community's net annual income was valued at 73 pounds, 9 shillings, and 10 pence, according to the Suppression Commission.

 
Early Documents
 

[1]The first document is a confirmation of the foundation by Thomas Becket (1162-71)
[2]Confirmation by John I (1205)

 
Architecture & Archaeology
 

Archbishop Zouche visited the nunnery on February 13, 1346 and noted that the convent had a church, refectory, dormitory, and parlor in the cloistral buildings, as well as chambers to the west of the church which he ordered moved so that the infirmary might be extended (The Fallow Papers, in Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, (1900-1901) Volume 21:225-253). An aerial photo was taken on June 17, 1951 (Cambridge Univ.: Dept. of Aerial Photo, FU 24-27).

 
State Of Medieval Structure
 

No visible evidence of the nunnery exists on the site.

 
Miscellaneous Information
 

Nunappleton appears to have had an anchorage attached or nearby after its foundation (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 30). According to Thompson, Nunappleton's links to the Cistercian order are also tenuous (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 110). The convent was allowed to continue until 1539.

 
Admin. Notes
 

[V0581]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Date Started
 
1148
 
Date Finished
 
1539
 
Length
 
1925