Gokewell
Community ID
 
980
 
Alternate Names
 
Gokwelle, Goykewell, Eskdale, Manby
 
Town
 
Lincoln
 
Diocese
 
Lincoln
 
Region
 
Lincolnshire
 
Medieval Location
 
Broughton
 
Modern Location
 
Gokewell; 1 1/2 miles northwest of Broughton, route 1207
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary
 
Date Founded
 
1150 (circa)
 
Date Terminated
 
1536
 
Religious Order
 
Cistercian
 
Rule
 
Benedictine
 
Foundation Information
 

According to S. Thompson, Gokewell was founded sometime between 1147 and 1175 by William de Alta Ripa and his wife, Juetta. Thompson speculates that the community may have an anchoretic origin (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 221).

 
Population Counts
 

There were 8 in 1440 and 7 in 1536.

 
Visitations
 

In the 13th and 14th centuries the comunity had a master or warden at times.

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Benefactors included Roger of S. Martin, Adam Payenl, William de Romara.

 
Relative Wealth
 

Gokewell was so poor members had to rely on relatives for clothing.

 
Assets/Property
 

The comunity's assets were about 10 pounds annually.

 
Income
 

In 1535 the community's annual income was valued at 16 pounds, 12 shillings, and 10 pence.

 
Architecture & Archaeology
 

The cloister was 79 feet north to south and 90 feet east to west.The two tallest ranges are the north and east which stand two stories high. The east range is 44 feet long with a chapter house which measures 38 feet long by 22 feet wide. Wood beams support the second floor of the east range. The aisleless church, on the north, is 90 feet long and 22 feet, 8 inches wide. An old stone basin is cemented into the middle room of the church. The west range in 60 feet long and 19 feet wide; while the sourth range is gone. Stone from the church was used to build a nearby Georgian house, now also deserted (Medieval English Cistercian Nunneries: Their Art and Physical Remains, 171).

 
State Of Medieval Structure
 

The site is now deserted, but the original buildings of the cloister are still standing. The convent's buildings have been gutted and remodeled to meet modern needs, but the sized of the nunnery's physical plan can be established since the walls of the priory still stand. [See Architecture/Archeaology] Stone from the church was used to build a nearby Georgian house, now also deserted (Medieval English Cistercian Nunneries: Their Art and Physical Remains, 171).

 
Manuscript Sources
 

British Library, Egerton Chartulary, 624.

 
Miscellaneous Information
 

It is possible that the nuns of Gokewell originally had connections with the nuns of Eskdale (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 36). They also appear to have had links to the canons of Thornholme, and even to have used a member of the priory of men as a scribe (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 67).

 
Admin. Notes
 

[V0398]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Date Started
 
1150
 
Date Finished
 
1536
 
Length
 
1892