Cannington
Community ID
 
1052
 
Town
 
West Bath
 
Diocese
 
West Bath
 
Region
 
Somershire
 
Medieval Location
 
The priory was located 3 miles north-west of Bridgewater on the road to Nether Stowey and Holford ; just east of the parish church.
 
Modern Location
 
Cannington
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary
 
Date Founded
 
1138 (circa)
 
Date Terminated
 
1536
 
Religious Order
 
Benedictine
 
Rule
 
Benedictine
 
Foundation Information
 

Robert de Courci, follower of emperess Matilda, with manor and advowson of the parish church.

 
Notable Heads
 

Bytelescumb, de Bere, Morton, Blachyngdon, de Bere, de Reigners, Joan, de Chedeldon, Gofys, and Eleanor de Verney.

 
Notable Members/Residents/Guests
 

Agnes de Newmarke in 1317, Sibyl de Horsy in 1317, Joan di Bratton in 1317, Matilda Pulham in 1333, and Alice Northlode in 1333. The community allowed many corrodies and temporary residence for lay women in the 14th century including: Dyonisia Peverel, Isabel Fychet, Joan Wason and Maud Poer.

 
Population Counts
 

There were 11 nuns in 1317, and 2 chaplains. At about the time of suppression there were 6 nuns besides the prioress. At suppression there were 5 nuns besides the prioress.

 
Visitations
 

Bishop nominates a nun at his election. There was a dispute over the election of the Prioress in 1317. There were also difficulties relating to scandal and lax administraton in the years, 1311, 1132, and 1351.

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Benefactors include the founder Hugh d'Welles, Bishop Lincoln by testament of 1212. Also Robert Fitz Pain in 1333, John d'Chidiok in 1354 and Robert de Sambourn in 1354.

 
Secular Political Affiliations
 

The community had permission of the Bishop to allow lay women and their servants in residence during holidays and for short visits. In the 14th century there were abuses of this practice.

 
Social Characteristics
 

Nuns and a prioress

 
Assets/Property
 

The comunity assets included land holding, chapels and a parish church, and chapter house. The community was in such poverty in the 14th century that it was exempted from tax rolls. By 1535 its assets were valued at 39 pounds.

 
Income
 

Income was derived from rents in the province and also by monies paid by lay boarders. Boarders payments were insufficient and this practice put a strain on the community's resources.

 
Litigations
 

The community had permission of the Bishop to allow lay women and their servants in residence during holidays and for short visits. In the 14th century there were abuses of this practice.

 
Admin. Notes
 

Mad 6/10/97
[V0230]
Scandals include a nun ( [CN=2X043] ) who gave birth about 1333 but who was still in residence in 1349. [unable to locate source for this ref. 3/23/99]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Contributors Notes
 

Scandals include a nun who gave birth about 1333 but who was still in residence in 1349.

 
Date Started
 
1138
 
Date Finished
 
1536
 
Length
 
1879