Broadholme Double Monastery
Community ID
 
1036
 
Alternate Names
 
Brodholm, Brodeholm, Brodhelme, Broddeholm, Backmund, S. Mary
 
Town
 
Lincoln
 
Diocese
 
Lincoln
 
Region
 
Nottinghampshire
 
Medieval Location
 
Broadholme is located at the cemetary church of S. Botulph inside Saxilby near the town.
 
Modern Location
 
Saxilby
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary
 
Date Founded
 
1154 or earlier, perhaps as early as 1143 when cannons of the male monastery Newhouse arrived from Flanders; community of both brothers and sisters since 1319.
 
Date Terminated
 
1536
 
Religious Order
 
Premonstratensian (Norbertine)
 
Foundation Information
 

Canons from the male monastery Newhouse arrived from Flanders in 1143. It was a community of both brothers and sisters since 1319. According to Thompson, a probable founder of the female community is Agnes de Goxhill (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 219).

 
Population Counts
 

There were 9 canonesses in 1494.

 
Dependency Of
 

Broadholme was a dependency of Newhouse, the preeminent Premonstatensian male monastery in England. The nuns try to gain independence from Newhouse around 1350.

 
Visitations
 

Resists becoming dependency of the male monastery Newhouse about 1350.

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Agnes de Goxhill, who may be the founder's wife. Further research is necessary to verify this. Queen Isabella acted as a benefactor about 1354.

 
Assets/Property
 

The value of Thorey church was estimated to be about 19 pounds in 1535.

 
Income
 

The net income in 1535 was over 16 pounds.

 
Early Documents
 

A charter of Edward II confirmed the donations made to the community of women at Broadholme and referred to grants made by Peter de Goxhill and Agnes his wife, the founders of ther abbey of Newhouse (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 141).

 
Published Primary Sources
  
Miscellaneous Information
 

Backmund was the first female Premonstratensian house in England. The abbey of Newhouse continued to exercise a considerable measure of control over Broadholme. In 1354 ordinances were drawn up which strengthened the authority of the prioress, but the abbot retained the right to hear confessions 4 times a year and to visit the house annually for 2 days (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 142).

 
Admin. Notes
 

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Contributors
 
WRL Project, Ericka Swensson
 
Date Started
 
1154
 
Date Finished
 
1536
 
Length
 
1830