Stamford
Community ID
 
904
 
Alternate Names
 
Stamford Baron and S. Michael's
 
Town
 
Lincoln
 
Diocese
 
Lincoln
 
Region
 
Northamptonshire
 
Modern Location
 
Stamford
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary and S. Michael
 
Date Founded
 
1154 or earlier
 
Date Terminated
 
1536
 
Religious Order
 
Benedictine/ Cistercian in the later half of the 15th century. It claimed to be Cistercian for some part of the 13th century.
 
Foundation Information
 

Elkins(1988) gives the foundation date of 1160. According to S. Thompson, this community was linked earlier with the abbey of Peterborough. Thompson also lists Abbot William of Waterville as the probable founder (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 229). Abbot William of Waterville granted the church of S. Michael at Stamford to the nuns and was described as the founder of the priory. The foundation documents stress the subjection of the community of women to Petersborough. A promise of obedience made by the prioress and convent of Stamford states that the nuns and all their belongings were at the disposal of the abbot and monastery (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 61).

 
Population Counts
 

The priory was intended for 40 nuns, and a prior and brethren were attached, the last record of them being in 1323. There were approximately 16 nuns at the time of suppression.

 
Incorporated Communities
 

In 1353-4 Wothorpe was united to Stamford.

 
Dependency Of
 

Peterborough [see foundation information above for details] It appears that the dominant role in the community of Stamford was taken by the prior, or magister, himself a monk of the abbey of Peterborough (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 62).

 
Income
 

In 1535 the net income of the community was valued at over 65 pounds.

 
Litigations
 

There is extant an inspeximus of a group of documents dating from 1269-73 which stated that Stamford was Cistercian and so exempt from the payment of a tenth (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 104). But Stamford seems to have later abandoned its claims to belong to the Cistercian order and tried to obtain exemption from taxes on the grounds that it was poor rather than because it was Cistercian (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 105).

 
Manuscript Sources
 

[1]British Library Cotton MS Vespian E.xxii, fo. 39.

 
Published Primary Sources
  
Miscellaneous Information
 

Priors and brothers are documented to 1323. The last nun was incorporated from Wothorpe, a Benedicitine community, in 1353-4. Prioress declares the second order (?). There is extant an inspeximus of a group of documents dating from 1269-73 which stated that Stamford was Cistercian and so exempt from the payment of a tenth (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 104).

 
Admin. Notes
 

miscellaneous field: order 2 : Prs declares = Prioress declares second order ?
BOSB / Benedictine
[V0816]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Date Started
 
1154
 
Date Finished
 
1536
 
Length
 
2552