S. Martiniano
Community ID
 
633
 
Alternate Names
 
Santa Maria di Brione; S. Maria della Sp... [cut off]
 
Town
 
Brione (Vallis de Turre)
 
Diocese
 
Torino
 
Region
 
Piedmont
 
Medieval Location
 
located at the foot of Monte Calvo; moves to Montecalieri after Council of Trent
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory, then Abbey
 
Date Founded
 
904
 
Date Terminated
 
1601 (see "Incorporated By," below).
 
Religious Order
 
Benedictine in 10th c.; Cistercian in 12th c.; Poor Clares after Council of Trent
 
Foundation Information
 

Orignated as a male Benedictine house, but was depopulated as a result of the saracen invasuions of the 10th c. In the 11th and early 12th centuries it is referred to as a church that had been given to the abbey of S. Salvatore (dioc. Torino). It is referred to as a monastery again in the late 12th century, and women appear some time between 1146 and 1197. The women lived in S. Martinano until the 1200's, when they occupied the new monastery of S. Maria.

 
Notable Heads
 

Prioresses: Remota (1200-08); Agnese (1229-38); Gordia (1245-47). Abbesses: Anna (1252-54); Ota (1259); Sibilla Grossa (1265-69); Galliana (1267-73); Giordana (1272-73); Luarghenta (1274-82); Margherita di Bardonecchia (1288-90); Agnese (1293-99)

 
Priveleges & Papal Exemptions
 

Innocent III, 22 January 1207.

 
Incorporated By
 

S. Chiara (Torino), 1601

 
Dependency Of
 

S. Salvatore (male) (Torino)

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Countess Margherita, wife of Tommaso I of Savoia (count of Morianne) takes the monastery under her protection and gave 20 soldi annually from 1197 to 1223.

 
Relative Wealth
 

Very wealthy, peaking in 13th c., declining 14th - 15th c.

 
Assets/Property
 

extensive landholdings

 
Other Economic Activities
 

banking operations

 
Early Documents
 

June 30, 1197: Peter di Brione cedes a field to the nuns of S. Martiniano.

 
Architecture & Archaeology
 

Cistercian elements include a T-shaped floor plan, but where the cistercian apses are rectangular, the apses of this monastery are semi-circular (Lombard style). The only other noticable Cistercian element is the location, in the country, suitable for agriculture.

 
Manuscript Sources
 

Torino, Archivio di Stato, Sala 14, Materie Ecclesiastiche monache, Briore, cistercensi, 2 da no., 1166-1602.

 
Contributors
 
Suzanne Wemple-Kinder
 
Date Started
 
904
 
Date Finished
 
1601
 
Length
 
1848