Himmelkron
Community ID
 
2394
 
Alternate Names
 
Corona Coeli
 
Town
 
Himmelkron
 
Diocese
 
Bamberg
 
Medieval Location
 
Berneck; The convent was founded in a valley of the Main river.
 
Modern Location
 
Himmelkron; in the governmental district of Oberfranken; in the administrative district of Kulmbach.
 
Corporate Status
 
Abbey
 
Dedication
 
Blessed Virgin Mary
 
Date Founded
 
1280
 
Date Terminated
 
1548-1569
 
Religious Order
 
Cistercian
 
Rule
 
Benedictine
 
Foundation Information
 

This Cistercian convent was founded by Count Otto III of Orlamuende together with his wife Agnes, a countess of Truhendingen, and his sons in 1280. The convent was founded in a valley of the Main river. The convent had a rich endowment through Otto's mother Beatrice's substantial inheritence from the family of Andechs-Meranien. In the foundation charter Otto retained the overarching advocacy as well as the supreme jurisdiction over the convent (Krausen, 53). The abbot of Langheim was given the responsibility of overseeing the community and making visitations. After the Orlamünde line died out, the advocacy over Himmelkron went to the counts of Nürnberg until the Reformation.

 
Notable Heads
 

Abbess Katharina von Schaumberg (d. 1411), who endowed the church and parish of Trebgast from her own fortune; Elisabeth von Künsberg (d. 1484), who laid an elaborate foundation stone in the cloister in 1473 which has since been partially destroyed.

 
Other Ecclesiastical Relations
 

The abbot of Langheim acted as the spiritual advisor for the convent.

 
Visitations
 

In 1456 and 1481 the General chapter made visitations and demanded reforms in Himmelskron. In 1497 the convent was visited by the abbot of Lanhheim and the prior of Heilbronn, who spoke primarily of claustration reforms.

 
Secular Political Affiliations
 

In the foundation charter Otto retained the overarching advocacy as well as the supreme jurisdiction over the convent (Krausen, 53). After the Orlamünde line died out, the advocacy over Himmelkron went to the counts of Nürnberg until the Reformation.

 
Social Characteristics
 

The convent's inhabitants belonged to many of the important families in the region: the Orlamünde, Hohenzollern, Schaumberg, Wirsberg, and Waldenfels families, among others (Krausen, 53).

 
Assets/Property
 

There is little information about the property and economic development of this convent.

 
Architecture & Archaeology
 

The convent church consisted of one long nave with a nuns' choir. The convent church became a protestant parish church. The convent buildings served as the summer residence for the margraves of Bayreuth.

 
Manuscript Sources
 

The archives for the community are located in the Hauptstaatsarchiv in München and in the Staatsarchiv of Bamberg. The British Library possesses a Processional in German and Latin, dating from the fifteenth century, which belonged to this house, #Add. 28214. The Stadtbibliothek in Mainz preserves a manuscript of Hugo de S. Victore, (c. 1461/3) which belonged to this house, #II, 122. The Staatsbibliothek in Munich preserves a work, #Clm 28822, and a fifteenth-century Liber precum held in the College Library in Ushaw, #27 (XvIII. D. 7.5) may have belonged to this house.

 
Secondary Sources
  
Miscellaneous Information
 

In 1467 and 1478 the abbess lodged complaints for fire-damage and the alienation of property. Under abbess Magdalena von Wirsberg (1490/1523) the convent flourished. In 1548 the convent converted to Protestantism under abeess Margareta von Dölau, who had been appointed by the margrave ; in 1569 after the death of Abbess Margarethe (Margareta), the convent was formally dissolved.

 
Admin. Notes
 

more research necessary Hist. Staetten, 278.

 
Contributors
 
June Mecham
 
Date Started
 
1280
 
Date Finished
 
1548
 
Length
 
3026