Haverholme Double Monastery
Community ID
 
989
 
Alternate Names
 
de Insula
 
Town
 
Lincoln
 
Diocese
 
Lincoln
 
Region
 
Lincolnshire
 
Medieval Location
 
On a marshy island in the river near Seaford which had originally been given to abbot [of Fountains?].
 
Modern Location
 
Haverholme
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary
 
Date Founded
 
1139 (circa)
 
Date Terminated
 
1538
 
Religious Order
 
Gilbertine
 
Foundation Information
 

Founded for Cistercian monks in 1137 and refounded for Gilbertine nuns in 1140. There were canons at the Priory by 1148. It lay within the episcopate of Alexander of Lincoln.[?] Thompson links this foundation with Bishop Alexander of Lincoln (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 222). Originally from Fountains, Cistercian monks left this site to go to Louth Park. The episcopy then offered the site to Gilbert of Sempringham.

 
Notable Heads
  
Population Counts
 

There were 100 females and 50 monks in 1148. There were 7 canons in 1381. In 1538 the house was surrendered by the prior and 6 canons; the prior, 4 canons, the prioress, and 7 nuns receiving pensions.

 
Incorporated Communities
 

It took the site originally granted to Cistercian men by episcopy of Lincoln.

 
Dependency Of
 

Although questionable, it may have been a dependency of Sempringham. Further research is necessary.

 
Visitations
 

It had close ties to episcopal see at Lincoln. In 1164 the community sheltered the archbishop of Canterbury.

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Benefactors were Simon Tushett, Henry II, Roger Mowbray and Roger de Lacy.

 
Secular Political Affiliations
 

knights fees

 
Assets/Property
 

The community owned mills, granges, and pasture for sheep that produced 15 sacks of wool annually. In 1254 it had income from spiritualities amounting to 40 pounds and from temporalities amounting to 101 pounds. In 1291 its income from temporalities amounted to 119 pounds.

 
Income
 

Income was derived from the rectories at Ruskington, Sleaford, and Anwick. In 1535 the community's net income was valued at over 70 pounds (Medieval Religious Houses in England and Wales, 171).

 
Litigations
 

It paid knights fees and had disputes regarding fisheries.

 
Published Primary Sources
  
Admin. Notes
 

[V0426]
Foundation information--Looks like something got lost - does this continue to LCP and read abbot of fountains?
Income-- Re-interpreted Latin to refer to British pound [from L]- spirit and temp to: spirituality and temporalities?

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Date Started
 
1139
 
Date Finished
 
1538
 
Length
 
1625