Hampole
Community ID
 
856
 
Alternate Names
 
Hanepol, S. Mary
 
Town
 
York
 
Diocese
 
York
 
Region
 
Yorkshire
 
Medieval Location
 
West Riding on road leading from Wakefield to Doncaster
 
Modern Location
 
6 miles north-west of Doncaster, route 638
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary
 
Date Founded
 
1156 or earlier
 
Date Terminated
 
1539
 
Religious Order
 
Cistercian
 
Rule
 
Benedictine
 
Foundation Information
 

Hampole was founded before 1156 by William de Clarefai and his wife Avicia de Tany.

 
Population Counts
 

There were 14 at dissoultion in 1539.

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Avice's daughter, Sibilla, and her son, Ralph de Tilii, and then their son, Roger.

 
Social Characteristics
 

The community had resident brothers.

 
Assets/Property
 

In 1267 the community had exceeded its means and no longer accepted new members.

 
Income
 

In 1535 the community's net annual income was 63 pounds, 1 shilling and 7 1/2 pence.

 
Early Documents
 

A description of the buildings was given by the Suppression Commission (London: P.R.O., SP 5/2/175-188).

 
Architecture & Archaeology
 

Excavations were conducted at Hampole in 1937 which proved the convent existed in the hamlet beyond a doubt (Excavations at Hampole Priory, 204-212). The archaeological dig produced the footing of the east cloister wall, 74 feet, 6 inches long, the south cloister wall, 64 feet long and the church choir, 20 feet long, with a separate house attached on the east, 15 feet long. Two square columns which are 8 feet high and 3 feet square with carved cone capitals flank a farm driveway and can still be examined. Nothing else exists "except some dressed stone in walls, a fine head-stop of a corbel, and a pinnacle in a front garden" (The Buildings of England, 242, quoted in Medieval English Cistercian Nunneries: Their Art and Physical Remains, 171).

 
State Of Medieval Structure
 

See Architecture/Archaeology above

 
Miscellaneous Information
 

According to S. Thompson, there appears to have been an anchorage attached to or nearby the community. No evidence survives of links between Hampole and a Cistercian abbey, but the house's claims to be Cistercian were endorsed by Pope Innocent III and referred to by Archbishop Walter Giffard (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 109). The ambiguity is reflected in the Suppression Papers, where Hampole is described as 'ordinis Sancti Augustini et de regula Sancti Benedicti Cistercien' (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 110). The Mappa Mundi describes the community in the same terms as the Gilbertine houses (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 111).

 
Conversi/ae and servants
 

There was a warden in 1268 and in 1314 and conversi in 1308.

 
Admin. Notes
 

[V0417]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Contributors Notes
 

There was some confusion regarding the order to which Hampole belonged. The community appears to have belonged to the Cistercian order; however, in the Suppression Papers, Hampole is described as 'ordinis Sancti Augustini et de regula Sancti Benedicti Cistercien' (Thompson, 110). In the Mappa Mundi, Hampole is described as a Gilbertine community (Thompson, 111).

 
Date Started
 
1156
 
Date Finished
 
1539
 
Length
 
2151