Flixton
Community ID
 
1070
 
Alternate Names
 
S. Mary and S. Catherine ; also known as Katharine and in 1428 as Flyxton .
 
Town
 
Ipswich
 
Diocese
 
Norwich
 
Region
 
Suffolk
 
Modern Location
 
Flixton
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary and S. Catherine, S. Barbara
 
Date Founded
 
1258, 1259
 
Date Terminated
 
1536/7
 
Religious Order
 
Augustinian
 
Rule
 
Augustinian
 
Foundation Information
 

In 1256 Margery de Hanes, daughter of Geoffrey and widow of Bartholomew de Crek (Creyk), was granted a license by Robert di Tatesale, son of Idem, a knight and her overlord, on fee, for 19 nuns.

 
Notable Heads
 

Eleanor / Ratlesden / Welholm / Stonham / Weltham / Hemynhall / Marshall / Marshall / Howell / Hereward / Moor / pilly / Ryc / Creyk / Helen / Artys / Isabel / Vyrly / Punder / Wright

 
Notable Members/Residents/Guests
 

Margeret Causten, suburban Pioress, 1493; Isabel Asshe, nun, 1520; John Wells a chaplain and kin to Prioress Mary Punder was banned from the community in 1514. In 1414 Flixton priory housed at least 16 corrodians (including 2 brothers, their wives and 2 maids; three sisters, their maid and chaplain, Roger Hord and his wife, Pamela, and a man named Blynde and his wife, as well as a Margaret Broton) (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 65). It further housed 2 chaplains and 20 hinds and household servants within its precincts Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 36).

 
Population Counts
 

There were 19 in 1258, 6 in 1493, 7 in 1520, 6 in 1526, 8 in 1532, and 8 in 1536.

 
Dependent Communities
 

Flixton in Yorkshire

 
Visitations
 

There was a visitation in 1433 concerning provisions for an ex-Prioress. Again in 1493 and 1514 visitations were conducted in response to complaints. 1520, idem ; In 1526 and 1532 visitations found the community to be satisfactory.

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

Robert de Tatesale , founder, and Robert de Crek, son of the founder, donated his rights in Flixton manor. adversary church / Robert di Cisterna , royal leech. / Prior to 1321 Cicely de Ufford, widow of Robert de Ufford : adversary church Helmingham ( to 1321 ); Bishop Bround made small bequests to the prioress and nuns here (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 57).

 
Secular Political Affiliations
 

In 1370 the community was in litigation in Rome with laity regarding repairs to the Fundenhall church.

 
Assets/Property
 

Flixton was founded with the properties of Flixton manor and the advowson of the parish church (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 24). In 1292 Flixton's assets were a manor and church at Flixton plus another church. The convent also owned a water mill. Circa 1350 the community also owned 2 chapter houses. By 1411 they had been privileged to acquire 10 pounds worth of property. In 1291 gross income was about 44 pounds. About 1292 the community assets were valued at more than 43 pounds per year. They declined after 1348 to nearly half their previous value at about 23 pounds. When the community was terminated in 1535 the value of their inventory was placed at 20 pounds. Knowles and Hadcock claim that at 1535 the net income was over 23 pounds (228).

 
Income
 

Income was largely from rent received from land holdings and chapter houses.

 
Charitable/Work
 

Flixton distributed more than 8 pounds a year to the poor on the anniversary of their foundation. In 1535 this equalled more than a quarter of their income. The nuns annually distributed 56 shillings, 8 pence in alms to the poor on the obit of Margery Creyk as well (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 63).

 
Litigations
 

In 1370 the community was in litigation in Rome with laity regarding repairs to the Fundenhall church.

 
Early Documents
 

[1]The first document records the granting of license to the comunity. (1256)
[2]The second known document is the donation of land by the founder.

 
Art & Artifacts
 

There is a seal used in the 13th and 14th centuries.

 
State Of Medieval Structure
 

Remains of the priory are situated approximately half a kilometer south-east of the ruined parish church and consist of a single length of wall with an arch within an irregular moated enclosure. The present Abbey Farm contains some of the medieval fabric, including parts of two window and a rubble walling. The existing wall may have been part of the refectory or church. The space between the existing wall and the farm represents the area of the cloister, but it is unclear whether this stood to the north or south of the church. A survey of the site in c. 1581 noted that the buildings had stood within the moat and that outbuildins containing the guest accommodations were still surviving (Gilchrist/Oliva, 91).

 
Manuscript Sources
 

British Library Stowe Charts. 291, 292.
British Library Campbell chart. xii, 20 (c. 1258).
There is also a 1536 receipt for rent of Helmingham lands of prioress, located in the National Archives, NRA 6277 Tollemache.

 
Miscellaneous Information
 

According to S. Thompson, early charters reveal strenuous attempts by the foundress and the Bishop of Norwich to limit the number of nuns in the convent and to ensure that there was adequate provision for them Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 187). It escaped termination date with Wolsey's fall, 1527-8.

 
Admin. Notes
 

[V0358]

 
Contributors
 
Marilyn Oliva
 
Date Started
 
1258
 
Date Finished
 
1536
 
Length
 
3131