Catesby
Community ID
 
907
 
Town
 
Lincoln
 
Diocese
 
Lincoln
 
Region
 
Northamptonshire
 
Modern Location
 
4 miles south-west of Daventry, route 425
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary, S. Edmund and S. Thomas Mar
 
Date Founded
 
1175 (circa)
 
Date Terminated
 
1536
 
Religious Order
 
Cistercian
 
Rule
 
Benedictine
 
Foundation Information
 

According to Elkins (1988) Catesby was founded in 1175 by the Canons of the male Augustinian monastery of Ashby in Northamptonshire. According to J.A. Nichols (1982), Catesby was founded circa 1175 by Robert de Esseby in the valley of Lower Catesby.

 
Notable Members/Residents/Guests
 

Archbishop Edmund Rich placed his sisters at Catesby and sent bequests to them (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 209).

 
Population Counts
 

There were 10 nuns including the prioress in 1536.

 
Dependency Of
 

Catesby is described in the Mappa Mundi as a community of nuns of Sempringham, but there is no corroborative evidence that Catesby was ever a member of the Gilbertine order, although it had a resident community of brothers and canons (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 78).

 
Income
 

In 1535 its annual income was valued at 132 pounds, 1 shilling, 11 1/4 pence.

 
Litigations
 

An isolated charter hints at links between Swine and Catesby when it records the prioress and convent of the Yorkshire house quitclaiming any right they might have in the churches of Ashby and Basford to their sisters, the nuns of Catesby, who are described as belonging to their order Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 70).

 
Art & Artifacts
 

An Early English Gothic doorway and window fragment can be found from the nunnery in a house two miles away in Upper Catesby (The Buildings of England, 145, quoted in Medieval English Cistercian Nunneries: Their Art and Physical Remains, 169)

 
State Of Medieval Structure
 

As late as the early nineteenth century a section of the nun's church was still standing, as illustrated by an india ink drawing done on July 6, 1811 by Gilbert Flesher of Towcester (London: British Museum, Add.37416, f.66). The physical remains of the convent can still be examined in the immediate area. In Catesby House, a dwelling originally built on the site and currently located one-half mile northeast of the site, can be found wood linenfold panelling and a staircase which probably came from the priory (

 
Manuscript Sources
 

Public Records Office, E326/694.

 
Published Primary Sources
  
Miscellaneous Information
 

Until 1310 lay brothers were also subservient to the master. An isolated charter hints at links between Swine and Catesby when it records the prioress and convent of the Yorkshire house quitclaiming any right they might have in the churches of Ashby and Basford to their sisters, the nuns of Catesby, who are described as belonging to their order (Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries After the Norman Conquest, 70).

 
Admin. Notes
 

[V0238]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Date Started
 
1175
 
Date Finished
 
1536
 
Length
 
2337