Bruisyard
Community ID
 
1066
 
Alternate Names
 
The community was also known as Annunciation, Bosyerd in 1428, and at times as Brosyerd.
 
Town
 
Ipswich
 
Diocese
 
Norwich
 
Region
 
Suffolk
 
Medieval Location
 
On the site of an ancient secular college - priests
 
Modern Location
 
Bruisyard
 
Corporate Status
 
Abbey
 
Dedication
 
S. Mary Annunciation
 
Date Founded
 
1364-6
 
Date Terminated
 
1539
 
Religious Order
 
Franciscan Minoresses
 
Foundation Information
 

The community was founded in an ancient male monastery where a college or chantry of canons had been previously. The community moved in 1326 from Campsey, an Augustinian community. Lionel, Duke of Clarence, is considered the founder.

 
Notable Heads
 

Emma, E. Beauchamp / Agnes / E. Bedingfield / Katharine / E. Crane / A.Clere / M Calthorp / M Page

 
Notable Members/Residents/Guests
 

Alice Blakeney, in the testament of Lionel Duke of Clarence. Around 1383 Sir Nicholas Gernoun, a knight in old age, was allowed to reside in the community and keep his wealth including rents. Anne Felbrigge, a nun of Bruisyard owned an embroidered psalter which has the obits of her parents entered in the calendar of saints (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 53). Maud of Ulster moved here in 1366 (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 59). She was later buried here. Maud was credited with founding the chantry which became this house.

 
Priveleges & Papal Exemptions
 

The community is thought to have had an exemption as there were no visitations from the Bishops of the Dioscese. Pope Sixtus IV granted to the nuns of Bruisyard and all others associated with the abbey, an indulgence which included choice of confessor and plenary remission of sin, regardless of their proximity to the abbey, at the hour of death (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 57).

 
Visitations
 

There is no documentation of visits from the bishop, indicating perhaps the community had a papal exemption.

 
Patrons/Benefactors
 

The Earl of Suffolk gave the manor of Benges to Bruisyard in 1385 which was soon exchanged with Campsey for a manor & church in Bruisyard. William Setman from the city of Norwich 142?. Margaret Purdens from the city of Norwich gave a book to the community in 1481. The community also benefited from the countess of Suffolk who boarded her daughters here (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 57). Maud, countess of Ulster, instituted a chantry of five priests here, which was founded for her by her son-in-law, Lionel, Duke of Clarence, and to which she moved in 1366 (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 59). Sir William Wychingham and Sir Nicholas Gernoun gave gifts of land to Bruisyard (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 60). Sir Roger de Boys also gave land in mortmain to Bruisyard.

 
Assets/Property
 

The community had land holdings and adversary chapter house. Property was sold to Campsey Campsey, from[?] the adversary church in 1385. In 1535 the net income was over 56 pounds. Total value from inventory was over 40 pounds in 1536 (mostly from plate).

 
Income
 

The community derived its income from manorial rents and from the chapter house.

 
Charitable/Work
 

The convent contributed a full seventeen percent of its annual income to the poor (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 64).

 
Early Documents
 

Patent Roll 28 Edward III (1364)

 
State Of Medieval Structure
 

Remains of the moated enclosure survive on three sides. Earthworks indicate fishponds to the north-west of the moat and a long rectangular orchard enclosure as well as remains of buildings. A seventeenth-century building on the site incorporates some of the medieval material and a room in the west range with a heavily beamed ceiling may have formed part of the medieval nunnery (Religious Women in Medieval East Anglia: History and Archaeology c. 1100-1540., 89).

 
Miscellaneous Information
 

The foundation date of of 1364 is uncertain. Further research is needed to be exact. Community evades suppression until 1536-7.

 
Admin. Notes
 

from Benefactors field: Is this a date?
AHA!!!!!/ Latin 56 much year , 1535 / corresponds to Knowles and Hadcock's net income in pounds for 1535 (Mecham:))

 
Contributors
 
Marilyn Oliva
 
Date Started
 
1364
 
Date Finished
 
1539
 
Length
 
2162