Aconbury
Community ID
 
1215
 
Alternate Names
 
Holy Cross; Acornebury
 
Town
 
Hereford
 
Diocese
 
Hereford
 
Region
 
Herefordshire
 
Modern Location
 
Aconbury
 
Corporate Status
 
Priory
 
Dedication
 
Holy Cross
 
Date Founded
 
1199-1216 (circa), though some sources say after 1237. Needs verification.
 
Date Terminated
 
1539 (needs verification)
 
Religious Order
 
Geronomite/Augustinian Rule after 1237
 
Rule
 
Augustinian
 
Foundation Information
 

Aconbury was founded by Margaret de Lacy, daughter of William de Braose, on land granted to her by King John shortly before his death (Thompson, 50). The church was built between 1230 and 1240. Originally, the community was to be of the order of the Hospital of S. John, but the foundress attempted to get the order changed to that of the Augustinians in order to make more spiritual provision for the souls of her family. This resulted in a dispute and a series of papal bulls which reveal that Margaret argued for the change on the grounds that her original endowment to the Hospitallers had been a mistake caused by women's ignorance (Thompson 50-51). Aconbury was founded after all other Geronomite communities and was incorporated by Buckland in Somerset around 1180 [sic! -- last date needs verification--possibly 1280?]

 
Notable Heads
 

NULL
In the 1230s, there was a dispute between the sub-priors and convent of Aconbury and the Knights Hospitallers over the elevation of a prioress, and the house had no prioress for several years.
The next prioress, mentioned in 1258, is only known by the initial H.
NULL
Next came NULL and NULL, although it is uncertain which was earlier
NULL
NULL
NULL
NULL
NULL

 
Population Counts
 

The priory was for a prioress and 7 nuns. There were 5 nuns in 1379 and 8 in 1539.

 
Social Characteristics
 

Granddaughters of the founder became nuns at Aconbury (Thompson, 181).

 
Income
 

In 1276, Henry III forbade Aconbury to receive new nuns without his consent because of their dire financial position (Thompson, 187). In 1535 the net income was over 67 pounds.

 
Charitable/Work
 

Care of the sick still appears to have played a part in the vocation of the sisters of Aconbury in the first part of the 13th century (Thompson, 50).

 
Litigations
 

Originally, the community wsa to be of the order of the Hospital of S. John, but the foundress attempted to get the order changed to that of the Augustinians in order to make more spiritual provision for the souls of her family. This resulted in a dispute and a series of papal bulls which reveal that Margaret argued for the change on the grounds that her original endowment to the Hospitallers had been a mistake caused by women's ignorance (Thompson 50-51).

 
Manuscript Sources
 

PRO [Pipe Rolls?], E315/55 fos. 22, 28, 39, 42, 55;PRO, E326/8712 and E326/8713; PRO E326/4020, E326/6158 and E326/891.

 
Admin. Notes
 

[V0002]

 
Contributors
 
WRL Project
 
Date Started
 
1199
 
Date Finished
 
1539
 
Length
 
2308